Printing Lingo

Have you ever stepped foot inside your printers offices and heard them talking at their usual fast pace about a bunch of things you’ve never heard of before?

Well, never fear. Here is a list of some commonly used terms in our world of print. There are hundreds more, but this is a good start.

Happy reading!

TILE

A tile is a seamlessly repeating section of a design that can be joined together multiple times (just like tiles in your kitchen) to create an “all-over” look.

SEAMLESS REPEAT

A seamless repeat is when the edge of a design/file matches up to the other edge of the same design perfectly with no errors or gaps.

STEPPED OUT REPEAT

To step-out a repeat is to create a file to a specified width or height, with the tile inside already repeated to the said width or height.

YIELD

To achieve the best possible yield in printing is to get as much as you possibly can from the
design and fabric.
Below are examples of good yield setup and not so good (average) yield setups.

AVERAGE YIELD

The red border in the above example outlines the fabric.
The fabric is 145cm wide. By placing 3 legs across the width in this manner, you will get 3 pieces out of 1m.
Meaning that each piece then equates to 33.33cm sq

If you order 100 pieces this means your total consumption would be 34m.

GOOD YIELD

The red border in the above example outlines the fabric.
The fabric is 145cm wide, but by placing the legs in a more jig saw pattern manner, you get 4 pieces out of 1.2m.
This means each piece now equates to 30cm sq, saving you 3cm per piece.

If you order 100 pieces this means your total consumption would then be 30m, a saving of 4m.

SELVEDGE

The edge produced on woven fabric to stop it from unravelling. Commonly used as a way to indicate the sides of the fabric when explaining its orientation.

YARDAGE / METERAGE

A distance or length measured in either yards or meters. Yardage is an American word that is still commonly used in Australia to indicate the length, although we use meters as a measurement. The use of yardage or meterage is generally to mean the same thing.[vc_empty_space height=”15px”][vc_column_text]

PLACEMENT/ENGINEERED

A placement or engineered print is a design that has been specifically placed into a digital pattern, such as the images of the leggings under the heading “yield” above. The stars would be considered placed/engineered into the digital leggings pattern.

PANELS

A panel is a file that does not repeat and can be printed with gaps between it and the next
instance of the file. The leggings pictured under “yield” would also be considered a panel.

RAILROADING

A design is considered railroaded when it has been rotated 90 degrees one way or another. Imagine a file standing up, and it is now lying down. This is mostly used in upholstering wide width lounges, where the pattern needs to continue down the length rather than the width.

WARP/WEFT

The edge produced on woven fabric to stop it from unraveling. Commonly used as a way to indicate the sides of the roll when explaining a repeat setup.

DIGITAL PATTERN

A digital pattern is a digitally replicated version of a standard cardboard pattern piece.

STRIKE OFF

A smaller, test piece of fabric that is printed prior to production as a ‘preview’ of what production will look like.

BASE FABRIC

A base fabric is the fabric in which you want to print on. Hence it’s name “base” fabric, it forms the base and then the print is pressed onto it.

CALENDAR PRESS

The machine in which fabric and papers are pressed together between rotating cylinders and heated drums.

MATAMERISM

In colorimetry, metamerism is a perceived matching of the colors that, based on differences in spectral power distribution, do not actually match. Colors that match this way are called
metamers.

For example: If two pieces of fabric look like they are the same colour when viewed under standard lighting in a room, yet they do not look like they are the same colour when moved into another room under different lighting, then this an example of matamerism occutring.

FACE IN VS FACE OUT

Face-in means that a fabrics printable face side has been rolled on the inside of the roll.
Face-out means that a fabrics printable face side has been rolled on the outside of the roll.

RASTERIZING

A rasterized file is one that is flat and uneditable. It has been flattened and becomes 1 dimensional and its elements uneditable.